Fuchsia Package Metadata

The Fuchsia package format contains an extensive metadata directory. This document describes the metadata extensions that are understood by Fuchsia itself.

See [https://fuchsia.googlesource.com/pm#Structure-of-a-Fuchsia-Package] for more information about where these files appear in a package.

metadata

See [https://fuchsia.googlesource.com/pm#metadata]

contents

See [https://fuchsia.googlesource.com/pm#contents]

signature

See [https://fuchsia.googlesource.com/pm#signature]

runtime

The runtime file specifies if execution of the application in the package should be delegated to another process.

The runtime file is a JSON object with the following schema:

{
    "type": "object",
    "properties": {
        "runner": {
            "type": "string"
        },
        "required": [ "runner" ]
    }
}

The runner property names another application (or a package that contains one) to which execution is to be delegated. The target application must expose the ApplicationRunner service.

sandbox

The sandbox file controls the environment in which the contents of the package execute. Specifically, the file controls which resources the package can access during execution.

The sandbox file is a JSON object with the following schema:

{
    "type": "object",
    "properties": {
        "dev": {
            "type": "array",
            "items": {
                "type": "string"
            }
        },
        "system": {
            "type": "array",
            "items": {
                "type": "string"
            }
        },
        "features": {
            "type": "array",
            "items": {
                "type": "string"
            }
        }
    }
}

The dev array contains a list of well-known device paths that are provided to the application. For example, if the string class/input appears in the dev array, then /dev/class/input will appear in the namespaces of applications loaded from the package.

The system array contains a list of well-known paths within the system package that are provided to the application. For example, if the string bin appears in the system array, then /system/bin will appear in the namespaces of applications loaded from the package.

The features array contains a list of well-known features that the package wishes to use. Including a feature in this list is a request for the environment in which the contents of the package execute to be given the resources required to use that feature.

The set of currently known features are as follows:

  • introspection, which requests access to introspect the system. The introspection namespace will be located at /info_experimental.

  • persistent-storage, which requests access to persistent storage for the device, located in /data in the package's namespace. (Future work will likely make this access more fine-grained than just the /data directory.)

  • root-ssl-certificates, which requests access to the root SSL certificates for the device. These certicates are provided in the /etc/ssl and /system/data/boringssl directories in the package's namespace. (The latter of which will be removed once all clients transition to the former.)

  • shell, which requests access to the resources appropriate for an interactive command line. Typically, shells are granted access to all the resources available in the current environment.

  • system-temp, which requests access to the system temp directory, located at /tmp in the package's namespace. (Future work will likely remove access to the system temp directory in favor of a local temp directory for each process.)

  • vulkan, which requests access to the resources required to use the Vulkan graphics interface.

See sandboxing.md for more information about sandboxing.